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Jazz LP’s to check out (Scroll down past History of LP) …

Jazz LP’s to check out (Scroll down past History of LP) …

LP Table Entry 1

LP Archives available here!

CONDITION CODES TABLE:

Note:  go to for lp maintenance tips:     https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/100173025722226330558/100173025722226330558/about

Sample

VG+ VG VG- F P MARKS SCUFFS STICKERS

LP RECORDS ARCHIVES – Jazz

ZOHO LP id_all ARTIST TITLE OEM 1 OEM 2 COND_CODES ORIG$ CURR$
CA 1 CA ADLY SOM_ELS BN UA
CA 2

Importtant Link to proper record care:     Google+

The LP (Long Play), or long-playing microgroove record, is a format for phonograph (gramophone) records, an analog sound storage medium. Introduced by Columbia Records in 1948, it was soon adopted as a new standard by the entire record industry. Apart from relatively minor refinements and the important later addition of stereophonic sound capability, it has remained the standard format for vinylalbums” up to the present.

At the time the LP was introduced, nearly all phonograph records for home use were made of an abrasive (and therefore noisy) shellac compound, employed a much larger groove, and played at approximately 78 rpm, limiting the playing time of a 12-inch record to less than five minutes per side. The new product was a 12 or 10-inch fine-grooved disc made of vinyl and played with a smaller-tipped “microgroove” stylus at a speed of 33⅓ rpm. Each side of a 12-inch LP could play for over 20 minutes. Only the microgroove standard was truly new, as both vinyl and the 33⅓ rpm speed had been used for special purposes for many years, as well as in one unsuccessful earlier attempt to introduce a long-playing record for home use. Although the LP was especially suited to classical music because of its extended continuous playing time, it also allowed a collection of ten or more typical “pop” music recordings to be put on a single disc. Previously, such collections, as well as longer classical music broken up into several parts, had been sold as sets of 78 rpm records in a specially imprinted “record album” consisting of individual record sleeves bound together in book form. The use of the word “album” persisted for the one-disc LP equivalent.

The LP was soon confronted by the “45”, a 7-inch fine-grooved vinyl record playing at 45 rpm, introduced by RCA Victor in 1949. Originally expected to compete with the LP, boxed “albums” of 45s were issued, as well as “EP” (Extended Play) 45s, which squeezed two or even three selections onto each side, but the 45 succeeded only in directly replacing the “78” as the format for issuing “singles” of individual popular songs. Reel-to-reel magnetic tape recorders posed a new challenge to the LP in the 1950s, but the higher cost of prerecorded tapes was one of several factors that confined tape to a niche market. Despite the later introduction of cartridge and cassette tapes, which were more convenient and less expensive than reel-to-reel tapes and became popular for use in automobiles beginning in the mid-1960s, the LP was not seriously challenged as the primary medium for listening to recorded music at home until the 1970s, when the audio quality of cassette tapes was greatly improved by better tape formulations and noise reduction systems. Only the 1983 advent of the digital Compact Disc (CD), which offered a recording that was truly noiseless and not audibly degraded by repeated playing or careless handling, succeeded in toppling the LP from its throne, but only after the initially high prices of CDs and CD players had come down.

Along with phonograph records in general, some of which were made of other materials, LPs are now widely referred to simply as “vinyl”. In the 21st century, a renewed interest in vinyl has occurred and the demand for the medium has been on a steady increase yearly in niche markets, though most modern listeners still prefer compact discs or file formats.[1]

Contents

[hide]

[edit] History and physical aspects

[edit] Soundtrack discs

The prototype of the LP was the soundtrack disc used by the Vitaphone motion picture sound system, developed by Western Electric and introduced in 1926. The maximum playing time of each side of a conventional 12-inch (30 cm) 78 rpm disc, slightly less than five minutes, was not acceptable. The disc had to play continuously for at least 11 minutes, long enough to accompany a full 1000-foot reel of 35 mm film projected at 24 frames per second. The disc diameter was increased to 16 inches (40 cm) and the speed was reduced to 33⅓ revolutions per minute. Unlike their smaller LP descendants, they were made with the same large “standard groove” used by 78s. The groove started at the inside of the recorded area and proceeded outward. Like 78s, early soundtrack discs were pressed in an abrasive shellac compound. They were played with a single-use steel needle held in a massive electromagnetic pickup with a tracking weight of five ounces. By the very early 1930s, all motion picture studios were recording on optical soundtracks, but sets of soundtrack discs, mastered by dubbing from the optical tracks, were made as late as 1936 for distribution to theaters still equipped with disc-only sound projectors.[2]

[edit]

RECORD COLLECTING HISTORY –

Record collecting: http://news.cnet.com/8301-13645_3-57335604-47/how-to-make-your-lps-sound-better-than-ever/?part=rss&subj=latest-news

(See no-nonsense Buyer/Seller’s Survey below …)

Description

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Record collecting is the hobby of collecting music. Although the main focus is on vinyl records, all formats of recorded music are collected.

History

Record collecting has been around probably nearly as long as recorded sound. In its earliest years, phonographs and the recordings that were played on them (first wax phonograph cylinders, and later flat shellac discs) were mostly toys for the rich, out of the reach of the middle or lower classes. By the 1920s, improvements in the manufacturing processes, both in players and recordings, allowed prices for the machines to drop. While entertainment options in a middle to upper class home in the 1890s would likely consist of a piano, smaller instruments, and a library of sheet music, by the 1910s and later these options expanded to include a radio and a library of recorded sound.

After the fall of the phonograph cylinder, the record was the uncontested sound medium for decades. The number of available recordings mushroomed and the number of companies pressing records skyrocketed. These were 78–rpm, originally one-sided, then later double-sided, ten-inch shellac discs, with about two to four minutes of recording time on each side.

Growth in the recorded sound industries was stunted by the Great Depression and World War II, when some countries were hamstrung by a dearth of raw materials. By the time World War II ended, the economy of these countries began to grow again. Classical music (which was a large portion of 78–rpm releases) was slowly edged into a minority status by the influx of popular and new music, which was less costly and thus more profitable to record.

Source

Description above from the Wikipedia article Record collecting, licensed under CC-BY-SA full list of contributors here. Community Pages are not affiliated with, or endorsed by, anyone associated with the topic.
  • NOTE:  thehappydrmmer lp archives – For Sale/Auction or
  • Library type check out! – $.50 per day overdue (Waived by purchase of $15 or more in LP’s.) I have new, used, and Rare items
    Hundreds of Jazz lp’s, many Collector’s Items.
    What Jazz LP, or other genre,  are You WISHING
    For?  Help me by describing your item.  I have a quick Order List
    Do you sell LP’s too?
    NOTE: SOMETIMES $VALUE IS HIGHER DUE TO THE SERIAL/CATALOG#/CATAGORY, AND NOT NECESSARILY THE CONDITION!
  • INTENTION here is to discover what you would tolerate in the
    condition of LP.
  • If I don’t have it, I search for it. I’ve done this all my
    life.
  •  I DO HAVE ROCK AND CLASSICAL LP’S AS WELL!

 http://news.cnet.com/8301-13645_3-57335604-47/how-to-make-your-lps-sound-better-than-ever/?

part=rss&subj=latest-newsCannonball Adderly, w/ Miles Davis “Somethin’ Else” (Sample) 

Here is an example of how thehappydrummer presents an LP 

LPID ARTIST ALBUM TITLE

TYPE (12″? STEREO/MONO?)OrigPriceCurrPriceCheckOutDateCheckInDateConditioncodes

HERE IS A BUYER/SELLER’S SURVEY TO VIEW. 

No commitments, just brief info from you to establish clarity of your lp requests! 

CLICK LINK …

http://spreadsheets.google.com/viewform?formkey=cDVmVmExQ1FmZ0V0V25aV0t6d2wtRGc6MA..

I will view your inputs, and get right back to you!  – Rich Platz, thehappydrummer !

Here is a link that describes my LP Records in more details!

http://thehappydrummer.wiki.zoho.com/

… and condition codes applied …

  • NM: NEAR MINT
  • VG: VERY GOOD
  • G: GOOD
  • F: FAIR
  • P: POOR
    • TYPE: box collection? two-fer? – 12″? STEREO/Mono?

    NUMBER DISCS?

    Leave related Comment at bottom …

    Rich:

NUMBER DISCS?
  • CONDITION DISC
  • COVER
  • MARKS?
  • STICKERS
=============================================================!
Go To:

Find out more on Jazz LP archive’s check out’s at:
http://thehappydrummer.wiki.zoho.com/Jammers-Correspondence-Page.html

Sample Library Check-out Form:

tba Date BorrowedFeb 8, 12 LP Title Ser. Num Date Returned $0.00$0.00

Owed

Paid

CA ADDERLY    BLN 1234 Stereo  Feb 29, 12
Sample $2.00

$4.00

Next?Get started by asking what you are searching for: See Google LP Archive Questionaire below:(Click it)   >>>>>>> https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=cDVmVmExQ1FmZ0V0V25aV0t6d2wtRGc6MA..#gid=0
 CA Adderly  Label_OEM                     Ser #         Type     Curr$    Orig$    
 Somthin’ Else        BN                 12″ ST
 In Chicago      Merc                          
ZOHO ss TO WORD 1
LP Assets_2013
ID AssetID AssetCategoryID Comments Descrip/Artist Make Model ModelNumber PurchasePrice SalvageValue SerialNumber Current Price DateAcquired
31 4 4 AvantGuard Braxton, Anthony IC 12″
1 2 2 Hard Bop Blakey, Art_Jazz Corn World BN 5 10 4016 Mono 15 04/05/2011
35 5 5 Romantic/Orch. Arthur, Brooks Verve V6 8850 4 8 V6 8850 12 06/26/1971
30 3 3 Strt Ahd Allison, Mose/Retrospect Colmbia C 30564 5 5 C 30564 10 01/21/1995
29 1 1 Hard Bop Adderly In Chicago Merc 4 11 15 01/21/1965
37 Prestige
36 Riverside              
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7 responses to “Jazz LP’s to check out (Scroll down past History of LP) …

  1. thehappydrummer

    September 30, 2012 at 4:46 pm

    Above LP Record Information as of September 30, 2012. Periodically updated for your covenience.

     
  2. thehappydrummer

    February 28, 2012 at 6:27 pm

    Cut and paste LP info from Zoho into here!

     
  3. thehappydrummer

    February 28, 2012 at 6:25 pm

    Rich
    copy/paste LP info from Zoho into here!
    Rich

     
  4. thehappydrummer

    May 15, 2011 at 2:18 am

     
  5. thehappydrummer

    February 26, 2011 at 5:32 pm

    Why not contact me, and ask if I have any classic jazz collector’s lp’s in my library. I have hundreds of albums.
    I also am looking for more LP’s as well!
    Rich
    http://thehappydrummer.wiki.zoho.com/Jammers-Correspondence-Page.html

     
  6. thehappydrummer

    February 23, 2011 at 11:09 pm

    Find out more on Jazz LP archive’s check out’s at:
    http://thehappydrummer.wiki.zoho.com/Jammers-Correspondence-Page.html
    Consider it a Jazz LP Library!

    … or contact Rich Platz at:
    platz_rich@hotmail.com

     

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